Unknown Artist - Night In The Casbah: Authentic Arabic Exotica

It is common for a song to have only a few lines of poetry and as few as only two themes. A "good" artist will never repeat the lines in exactly the same way In doing so, the singer can imply different connotations, highlight different words, etc. Again, the goal is to never repeat the lines in exactly the same way.

It is considered inauthentic, almost like telling a lie: If music is an expression of the self, and no two moments are the same, and no two people are the same, why would you even want to play something exactly the same way today as you did yesterday?

Singers and soloists may stray from the time-signature used by the rest of the group. This is another way of playing with the melody. There is even an entire musical structure based on this called Taqsim also spelled takseem, taqseem, ta'sim, etc.

Now that I am used to it, Middle Eastern music is the most natural-feeling sound I can imagine. It feels like home as much as any other style I grew up hearing. After extended periods of time listing to only this type of music, most Western styles strike me as juvenile, predictable, and even heartless. There are "good" and "bad" examples of every culture's music.

The only way to really know the difference is to really understand it and its context. One person found this helpful. I have had the original album from since I was a child circa and I have got to say that the quality of your recordings are the best I have heard in decades.

Beautiful and crystal clear. It brings back such loving memories of my late father who gave the album to me. For all you nah sayers out there, this is the real thing.

I have the original album that was cut in July in Algiers. The album I have has only 6 of the songs offered by this current company. Vocals are by Anissa Zouina and Anissa Toraia. The original company name was Esoteric Records Inc. I do not have the album cover, just the original record. My father gave it to me in the early 's so that I could dance to it. I loved it and still do. It is still my favorite of all my Arabic albums. Though new Arabic music recordings have all the advantages of new recording techniques sand instruments, this album still harkens back to the smoke filled cafe's of the old world over 60 years ago.

According to my father the liner notes said the original recordings were on the old wire tape recorders. I can not swear to this though LOL. Thank you, thank you, for making this available in digital form. I have not played my album in years in order to preserve it and I have missed it soooo very much.

And for you snobs out there who think I do not know what I am speaking about, yes I am a professionally trained Belly Dancer. I was trained by the great Rhea of Greece back in when I was 18 and she was still living in San Francisco. Rhea's current website can be found at the following if you still doubt me: [ As the Bethnal Green girls harmonize, we can easily imagine them wearing diaphanous veils and harem pants while sand-stepping in unison around a cardboard cut-out sphinx during a BBC TV variety special.

Gloucestershire genius Joe Meek's technical wizardry enhanced many Britxotica recordings as his progressive skills perfectly suited the experimental nature of the music. Working on Yashmak with Latin bandleader Chico Arnez, aka Streatham born bassist Jackie Davis, he creates a strident mix of bongos, drums and finger symbols in an attempt to conjure up an authentic Arabian atmosphere.

He achieves this brilliantly, a considerable accomplishment as it was engineered in Pye Studios, just off the Marylebone road. Here, in mashed-up Britxotica fashion, he combines the composition 'In a Persian Market' with something unexpected, England's latests dance craze, The Twist.

Changing his name to Stanley Black, he achieved enormous success on both sides of the Atlantic with lush orchestral arrangements.

Black was also one of the first English artists to release a long playing record and explore Latin American rhythms. Most Wished For in Arabic Music. Music of Mohamed Abdel Wahab. Simon Shaheen. Magida El Roumi. Amer Ammouri. Arabic Beat. Dave Holland. Best of. Natacha Atlas. Omme Kolsoum - The Classics.

Oum Kalsoum. Best of Farid Al Atrash. Hossam Ramzy. Rumba Argelina. Radio Tarifa. Cruzando El Rio. Irak: Art of the Oud. Mystical Legacies. Ali Jihad Racy. Harmony is a hard thing to get just right when you use quarter tones anyway. It has been perceived as creating dissonance, not beauty.

Also, this music has a strong tradition of improvisation and "decoration" see below , which would make harmony a very difficult if not impossible task to maintain. You won't hear a lot of volume variation for good reason: The traditional instrumentation of this region is very portable, which means small enough to carry.

These instruments do not allow as much variation in volume as things like large brass or string instruments. It was noteworthy because most instruments invented before that time, such as the ones played by this CD's musicians, had a significantly more limited range of volume. Actually, what you are hearing is very complex. Each instrument has a unique role, sometimes joining forces with another, but mostly producing a distinct layer to the music. Try clapping a rhythm, then having a friend clap a different rhythm with you.

Welcome to a new kind of complexity, one that reflects an ongoing ecosystem rather than the path of a single being. It is common for a song to have only a few lines of poetry and as few as only two themes.

A "good" artist will never repeat the lines in exactly the same way In doing so, the singer can imply different connotations, highlight different words, etc. Again, the goal is to never repeat the lines in exactly the same way. It is considered inauthentic, almost like telling a lie: If music is an expression of the self, and no two moments are the same, and no two people are the same, why would you even want to play something exactly the same way today as you did yesterday?

Singers and soloists may stray from the time-signature used by the rest of the group. This is another way of playing with the melody. There is even an entire musical structure based on this called Taqsim also spelled takseem, taqseem, ta'sim, etc. Now that I am used to it, Middle Eastern music is the most natural-feeling sound I can imagine.

It feels like home as much as any other style I grew up hearing. After extended periods of time listing to only this type of music, most Western styles strike me as juvenile, predictable, and even heartless. There are "good" and "bad" examples of every culture's music.

The only way to really know the difference is to really understand it and its context. One person found this helpful.

Top critical review. The price should warn you right away that this is not a world-class recording, and indeed, it is not. The singer and musicians whoever they are: not identified! All the songs are by the same gang of unidentified musicians. They sound like a good local belly-dance orchestra in Cairo, Istanbul, or Fez.

There's some very yeomanly work on the qanun, in particular. And the girl singer is truly a find. With the right producer, engineer, and studio she could be a world-class recording artist.

She has a well-controlled, 'cute' voice and does not shy away from sounding sexy.

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9 thoughts on “Unknown Artist - Night In The Casbah: Authentic Arabic Exotica

  1. Looking for Night in Casbah: Authentic Arabic Exotica / Var - Night in the Casbah? Visit Decluttr for great deals and super savings with FREE shipping today!
  2. May 30,  · 1. Most Middle Eastern music is really about the RICHNESS of the POETRY. It is common for a song to have only a few lines of poetry and as few as only two themes. A "good" artist will never repeat the lines in exactly the same way ever. In doing so, the singer can imply different connotations, highlight different words, etc/5(9).
  3. Jul 08,  · Nar Houbi Techaal By Night in the Casbah. • 1 song, Play on Spotify. 1. Nar Houbi Techaal. Featured on Bellydance: Authentic Arabic Exotica. More by Night in the Casbah. More Night in the Casbah. Listen to Night in the Casbah now. Listen to Night in the Casbah in full in the Spotify app Listen to all your favourite Music Duration: 5 min.
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  5. Find album reviews, stream songs, credits and award information for Night in Casbah: Authentic Arabic Exotica - Various Artists on AllMusic - /
  6. This was one of the first CDs of Middle Eastern music I owned. Like many reviewers here, at the time, I thought the singer was off key and unrefined. The songs seemed repetitive and lackluster. Now that I've spent over 15 years learning about Middle Eastern music, dance, art, history, and culture, I know /5(9).
  7. Night In The Casbah - Bellydance: Authentic Arabic Exotica music MP3 album at CD Universe, enjoy top rated service and worldwide shipping. Everything Artist Title Song SoundTrack Label Help.
  8. Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Night in Casbah: Authentic Arabic Exotica by Various Artists (CD, Mar, Laserlight) at .
  9. Night in the Casbah, Category: Artist, Albums: Bellydance: Authentic Arabic Exotica, Top Tracks: Asmaousemara, Chataaraban, Nar Houbi Techaal, Shway Shway, Ahsin, Monthly Listeners: 8, Where People Listen: Purmerend, Setagaya-ku, Stockholm, Anaheim, Yonkers Listen to Night in the Casbah now. Listen to Night in the Casbah in full in the.

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