The Inner Struggles Of A Man - Chicago - Chicago XI

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In this day and age it's really hard to look at music for any creative purposes. I admit it it's all getting better in many ways but the fact is the attitude that "it's not show art,it's show business" seems to have pretty much saturated everyone,from the industry to the record buyer for at least the last decade and a half. When Chicago recorded this album 32 years ago the the perception of music was quite different.

Many had learned to understand the best way to sell records was to do something innovative and exciting,basically never to look down the nose of the record buyer and give them credit for their musical enjoyment abilities. The sad fact is this album will always represent an ending for Chicago;it was not only their final commercial triumph of the 70's but as we know founding member Terry Kath never lived to see the album become so successful.

And that's interesting because this is an album only features one song by Peter Cetera and that of course is "Baby What A Big Surprise",an unusually orchestraded epic ballad that is pretty likely one of radio listeners main attractions to this album if they don't go directly for the best-of packages. Terry's "Mississippi Delta City Blues" really gives up the funk in a series way;he was always great with the whole blues functioning as funk you really cannot have one without the other anyway and get's the album started on a great note to boogie down to.

Robert Lamm,in an apparent turn against public opinion of the day to law enforcement paints a lonley,poetic picture in "Policeman",another terrific breezy jazz-oriented tune. David Wolinski started out as a sideman for Chicago before he joined Rufus,a band that Lamm again throws down another funny political satire in "Vote For Me",complete with this gospel beat and hallelujah chorus.

Both Terry Kath and Lee Loughanne,who himself never sings too often on a Chicago tune get a turn at rockier songs on Terry's riff heavy "Takin' It On Uptown" and Lee's "This Time",although the latter naturally leaning towards the jazz side of things. The hornless versions of these tunes are interesting though don't add a whole lot to the finished versions. This album is not only a huge triumph as well as epitaph for Terry Kath in terms of his participation but also flaunts the many talents he had within the band and it's principle members.

It would seem to split in a million different directions in the years to come but in terms of Chicago's classic hit making period that had begun only eight years earlier. And the fact Chicago had a presense on the charts and in the record stores for every single one of those years says an awful lot for one of the hardest working and recording bands of it's era. I remember getting it hot off the presses, spinning it, and thinking, "Well, it ain't as good as X. Then, Terry Kath shot himself and the set took on a whole new meaning as a swansong.

The recently released Rhino remaster conjures uip all of these things. It's eerie that Kath's last recorded tune has him singing about hopping train "number 86" "Takin' It On Uptown".

It's also still hard to hear him croon, " But the music is good. After years of experimenting, Kath finally cemented "Mississippi Delta City Blues" into a terrific hook with workable lyrics.

As an opener, it gets the set off to a great start. Lamm's "Vote for Me" has always been hilarious, and, as I get older, the lyrics make much more sense. This could easily stand as Kath's memorial. In my opinion, the only Chicago album better than it is Chicago V, and V is perfect.

One of the things that makes this album so great is what I like to refer to as "The Magnificent Three", or "The Dynamic Trio", or something like that. Three songs on here that are some of my favorite Chicago songs of all time. Even the Cetera ballad isn't bad.

My only problem with Chicago XI isn't due at all to the music, it's the sloppy packaging of the Rhino re-master. The cover behind the CD is just the police chase picture on the inside of the XI LP, that wasn't scaled to fit CD case size, so they just put two big white bars on the top and bottom. I mean, come on, X was put together better! Post a Comment. Sunday, November 20, Chicago XI From the opening bass chops of Peter Cetera and the haunting laugh of Terry Kath- this album is gripping.

The final album of the original line-up of Chicago shows a return to some of the hard rock stylings of their debut album on songs such as Mississippi Delta City Blues and Takin' It On Uptown. This song can be interpreted on multiple levels. Terry's laugh at the beginning of the song juxtaposed with the lyrics about masking his unhappiness is a very nice creative effect.

Peter Cetera shines on the bass on this song. The guitar riff is catchy, the horns accent Terry and Peter's performance. Although this song had been around since Chicago's days playing the club circuit in the late sixties, the lyrics seem particularly pertinent to Terry's feelings at the time of its recording. His unhappiness is expressed throughout the song despite his somewhat jovial tone- it's almost eerie that this was recorded so close to Terry's death.

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In this day and age it's really hard to look at music for any creative purposes. I admit it it's all getting better in many ways but the fact is the attitude that "it's not show art,it's show business" seems to have pretty much saturated everyone,from the industry to the record buyer for at least the last decade and a half.

When Chicago recorded this album 32 years ago the the perception of music was quite different. Many had learned to understand the best way to sell records was to do something innovative and exciting,basically never to look down the nose of the record buyer and give them credit for their musical enjoyment abilities. The sad fact is this album will always represent an ending for Chicago;it was not only their final commercial triumph of the 70's but as we know founding member Terry Kath never lived to see the album become so successful.

And that's interesting because this is an album only features one song by Peter Cetera and that of course is "Baby What A Big Surprise",an unusually orchestraded epic ballad that is pretty likely one of radio listeners main attractions to this album if they don't go directly for the best-of packages.

Terry's "Mississippi Delta City Blues" really gives up the funk in a series way;he was always great with the whole blues functioning as funk you really cannot have one without the other anyway and get's the album started on a great note to boogie down to.

Robert Lamm,in an apparent turn against public opinion of the day to law enforcement paints a lonley,poetic picture in "Policeman",another terrific breezy jazz-oriented tune. David Wolinski started out as a sideman for Chicago before he joined Rufus,a band that Lamm again throws down another funny political satire in "Vote For Me",complete with this gospel beat and hallelujah chorus.

Both Terry Kath and Lee Loughanne,who himself never sings too often on a Chicago tune get a turn at rockier songs on Terry's riff heavy "Takin' It On Uptown" and Lee's "This Time",although the latter naturally leaning towards the jazz side of things.

The hornless versions of these tunes are interesting though don't add a whole lot to the finished versions. This album is not only a huge triumph as well as epitaph for Terry Kath in terms of his participation but also flaunts the many talents he had within the band and it's principle members.

It would seem to split in a million different directions in the years to come but in terms of Chicago's classic hit making period that had begun only eight years earlier. And the fact Chicago had a presense on the charts and in the record stores for every single one of those years says an awful lot for one of the hardest working and recording bands of it's era.

I remember getting it hot off the presses, spinning it, and thinking, "Well, it ain't as good as X. Then, Terry Kath shot himself and the set took on a whole new meaning as a swansong. The recently released Rhino remaster conjures uip all of these things. It's eerie that Kath's last recorded tune has him singing about hopping train "number 86" "Takin' It On Uptown". It's also still hard to hear him croon, " But the music is good.

After years of experimenting, Kath finally cemented "Mississippi Delta City Blues" into a terrific hook with workable lyrics. As an opener, it gets the set off to a great start.

Chicago XI () was the final studio effort to feature the original septet, who by this time had been performing and recording for nearly a decade. In late January , founding member Terry Kath (guitar/vocals) accidentally and fatally shot himself, forever altering the band's sound and indeed much of the combo's tenacious rock & roll heart.

8 thoughts on “The Inner Struggles Of A Man - Chicago - Chicago XI

  1. May 26,  · Chicago - Chicago XI (Expanded & Remastered Chicago XI (Expanded & Remastered) "Takin' It On Uptown" and Lee's "This Time",although the latter naturally leaning towards the jazz side of things."The Inner Struggles Of A Man" is a very cinematic,movie score kind of orchestration from Dominic Frontiere that leads very well into a prelude /5(33).
  2. Listen to your favorite songs from Chicago XI by Chicago Now. Stream ad-free with Amazon Music Unlimited on mobile, desktop, and tablet. Download our mobile app now.
  3. View credits, reviews, tracks and shop for the CD release of Chicago XI on Discogs/5(12).
  4. The Inner Struggles of a Man This song is by Chicago and appears on the album Chicago XI (). You must enable javascript to view this page. This is a requirement of our licensing agreement with music Gracenote.
  5. Nov 20,  · The Inner Struggles of A Man-The orchestration on this piece provides a beautiful segue from the more upbeat This Time to the more somber Little One. It's a very beautiful piece and it sounds like it could be used for a film. Prelude (Little One)- Picking up where The Inner Struggles of A Man crescendoes this is an excellent lead-in to Little One.
  6. Chicago XI is the ninth studio album (eleventh overall) by the American band Chicago, released in The album marked the end of an era for Chicago in more ways than one. This would be the last Chicago album to feature guitarist and founding member Terry Kath prior to his death in an accident with a gun just over four months later.
  7. May 26,  · Stream Chicago XI by Chicago and tens of millions of other songs on "Takin' It On Uptown" and Lee's "This Time",although the latter naturally leaning towards the jazz side of things."The Inner Struggles Of A Man" is a very cinematic,movie score kind of orchestration from Dominic Frontiere that leads very well into a prelude that begins /5(33).
  8. The Inner Struggles of a Man This song is by Chicago and appears on the album Chicago XI ().

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